Jones Fractures

Image Credit: Canvas Art Rocks (sourced via Google Images)

Image Credit: Canvas Art Rocks (sourced via Google Images)

Of all the fractures that occur in the foot, the Jones fracture is one of the more common metatarsal fractures. The fifth metatarsal bone is the on the exterior periphery of the foot and is connected to the smallest toe. When there is a fracture between the base and the shaft of the fifth metatarsal bone, the condition is described as the Jones fracture. Named after its discoverer Sir Robert Jones. The Jones fracture is easily treatable by procedures such as minimally invasive surgery.

Occurring in the metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction, the types of people most susceptible to a Jones fracture include athletes who are constantly applying pressure to their feet. Statistical surveys have identified that basketball players are the athletes that are most susceptible to this condition. If you’re athletic, carefully consider your body position as you’re in motion. Should you succumb to such an injury, orthopaedic surgeons are an excellent source of treatment.

Jones Fracture Symptoms:

Painful walking experiences

Swollen feet, particularly at in the region at the base of the small toe

Position of fracture – highlighted

Position of fracture – highlighted

Jones Fracture – treated with Minimally Invasive Surgery and Synthetic bone  Surgeon: Dr Gordon Slater

Jones Fracture – treated with Minimally Invasive Surgery and Synthetic bone

Surgeon: Dr Gordon Slater

Approaching your Doctor

If you have been involved in strenuous physical activity and suspect that you may have a Jones fracture, approach your doctor for a diagnosis and referral to a Specialist. Treatment options for Jones fractures include:

Plaster

Walking orthotic

Minimally Invasive Surgery

Keyhole Surgery